Why Offer Legal Benefits

Why Offer Legal Benefits

Seven Out of Ten

More than 70 percent of U.S. households had the need for a lawyer in the previous 12 months, and also found that most of those consumers felt uncertain about how to tell a good lawyer from a bad one. It would not be a far stretch to say that as many as 70 % of your employees may have the need for an attorney in the next twelve months. Out of these employees, how many can afford out of pocket an attorney. And how many know where to turn for the right help with a complicated probate, or step parent adoption?

 

Your employees can feel lost and alone facing a legal problem. And their work can suffer.

Employees are placed under a great deal of stress by everyday life situations. This includes family problems, bad financial planning, debt collection, foreclosure, identity theft, and many others. The employee needs to spend time (a limited resource) to deal with a life situation, but sometimes can't spend the time needed because their job requires them to spend that time at work. Most times the employee will need to retain an attorney, which requires the employee to spend more time away from work.

 

Today, your employees are facing more legal issues than they were ten years ago. According to a caseload study by the National Center for State Courts, the number of cases filed in state court has risen 13 % across the board between since 1995. In some states, such as Texas, that number is closer to 51%.  When the studies are looked at by type, child support cases filed have risen 29% and custody cases have risen 49%.

 

Did You Know?

Even with a legal plan, without the RIGHT help, your employees can spend up to 3 business days just looking for the RIGHT type of attorney when a legal matter arises. With our process and technology, the amount of time an employee spends outside of work when a legal issue arises is dramatically reduced.

 

The Costs of Not Providing an Insured Legal Plan.

It is well documented that stress is a leading cause of unscheduled absenteeism, costly presenteeism, high turnover, accidents and errors. Studies have found that approximately 60 percent of workers’ compensation awards and 40 percent of job turnover are due to stress. 

The cost of stress is staggering. The American Institute of Stress (AIS) puts it at $300 billion annually, which includes “accidents, absenteeism, employee turnover, diminished productivity, direct medical, legal, and insurance costs, workers' compensation awards as well as tort and FELA [Federal Employers’ Liability Act] judgments.”

Actual costs of stress per employee run about $798 per year, according to CCH, Inc. in their CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey. There is also evidence that stress is correlated with heart disease (and many other medical problems) and that reducing stress can boost one’s immune system and help control diabetes. Many experts find that as much as 60 percent of all doctor visits may be stress-related. The medical costs are indeed enormous.

Unscheduled absenteeism can cost large companies an estimated $850,000 per year. Similar to the 2005 survey results, the 2006 survey found that 65% of unscheduled absences—two out of every three absent employees—were for reasons other than personal illness.  16th Annual CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey – 2006.

Employee Stress    Productivity    Absenteeism    Presenteeism    Accidents and Errors    Employee Retention    Employee Morale

  • „ 84% of the women surveyed with an elder parent who had received elder care indicated no plans were made until elder issues had surfaced. 
  • Securian Financial Group, Inc. Survey by Gestalt Inc. 2007.
  • „ 43% of all legal problems facing US employees are related to the family – divorce, child support, visitation and custody, alimony, and adoption. 
  • Legal Access Reporting Statistics 2007.
  • „ Only 49% of US employees have a will, despite almost 93% responding that having a will is important.   Gallup Poll 2007.
  •  Reasons other than illness for worker absenteeism pose the biggest worry for employers. 16th Annual CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey – 2006 and CCH Unscheduled Absence Survey, 2001